Skip to main content

About your Search

20121007
20121007
STATION
CSPAN2 17
FOXNEWS 15
CNN 13
CNNW 12
CSPAN 11
SFGTV 11
SFGTV2 10
FBC 8
KGO (ABC) 8
MSNBC 6
MSNBCW 6
WBAL (NBC) 5
KPIX (CBS) 4
KNTV (NBC) 3
WUSA (CBS) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 166
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 166 (some duplicates have been removed)
of you in the back -- i will read it for you. bob actually said in an interview, "the united states both economically and mill tarle and also in terms of its overall influence is really is as strong as its ever been." he said this on february 21, 2012. do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it has ever been? >> it depends, david, if you are speaking about strong relative to whom. i think it is true we are still the most emulated in the world. but it is possible to be the world's cleanest dirty shirt. so i sort of america as going back to -- i have to answer this in a little bit of detail. in terms of, one of the things that made us strong to start with, and i would argue, that we actually had a formula for success in this country. one, we educate our people up to and beyond what the technology was, so they can get the most out of it. whether it was universal secondary education, and then it was universal post secondary education. second, we have the world's best infrastructure. roads, railroads, third, we have the world's most immigrat
. >> they're two of the most well-recognized journalists in the united states. pioneers and advocates. for more than two decades maria and george have informed million of hispanics through the popular evening newscast. their brand of journalism is characterized not only by subjective and perspectives, but also by a high degree of social advocacy. in the last three decades both have covered a wide range of news and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in afghanistan. an assignment that at the time the network deemed too dangerous. he's had very public e
here tonight will become president of the united states. the candidates are senator dan quayle and lloyd bentsen, the democratic nominee. [applause] for the next 90 minutes, we will be questioning the candidates following a format designed and agreed to by representatives of the two campaigns. however, there are america rigid restrictions on the questions my colleagues and i may ask. the first question goes to senator quayle. you have to the minister responded. you have been criticized for your decision to stay out of the vietnam war, for your poor economic -- academic record. more troubling by some of the comments to have made in your own party. a separate -- secretary of the state said your peck was the dumbest mistake george bush could have made it. your leader added to the senate said a better qualified person could have been chosen. other republicans have been more critical in private. why do you think you have not made a more substantial impression on some of the people who have been able to observe the up close? >> the question goes to whether yes or qualified to be the
returning to the united states and deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north korean. cannot possible read the bock without being moved to tears in just about every single chapter. and the stories are incredible they go in to greater detail on some of these momentarily. melanie kirkpatrick, whom jay will introduce her shortly using the best of the journalist sensibility honed at nearly three decades at the "the wall street journal" to highlight the human side of north korea. we are deeply proud of her and we look forward to her comments today. copies of the escape from north korea are available for purchase at the event for $20 and melanie kirkpatrick will be glad to sign your copy. it's available online at amazon.com. i urge all of you to read it and discuss it and tread again. i ?row the special pleasure of introducing my friend jay. he's a senior partner at kirk land and ellis here in new york city. he's a well known commodity in the washington policy world having served with the distinction in two different administration as cabinet secretary under president george h. w.
, so is mr. mondale's. they saved the life of the president of the united states. i thought that was a cheap shot telling the american people to try to divide class, rich and poor. but the big question, it isn't whether mrs. ferraro is doing well. i think they are depog pretty well. i know barbara and i are doing well. and it is darn sure mr. mondale is doing well with $1.4 million. but the question is, are the tax codes fair? the answer is, the rich are paying 6% more on taxes and the poor are getting a better break. they went to the ethics committee. they went to change the trust. the trust has been revealed. and i was sure glad to see that i had paid 42% of my gross income in taxes. >> are you really a texan? >> i am really a texan. i may have noted she has a new good accountant. i would like to get his name and phone number. i think i paid too much in the way of taxes. and residents, mr. boyd, legal residence for voting is very different. the domicile, they call it, very different than the house. they say you are living in the vice president's house. therefore you don't
made it to the united states yea 1975 when i told them that ith, was for a class assignment. finl in one fell swoop, i got my le homework done and the history. e when i land, when i was five not months old, my family come andn you have to understand that family in thefa vietnamese contd doesn't mean that nuclearaal aud context. grandm my family including my mom and dad, my maternal aunt and grandmother and the elder brothers and sisters, just barely escaped saigon in 1975. it was full of twists and turnsk and happenstance. we easily could have been sucke back in vietnam rather than escape to america. so on that day, and it was april 29, 1975, as white chr tristmas layout played out again and again on the american radio station, this was thenel signal for u.s. personnel to s move to our evacuation points and cities. my father who had served in the top vietnamese army understood that it was time that we, too, prepared to leave our home his country. for months, he and his kin had planned possible escape routes and finally decided on one.safe. his cousin had access to a helicopter tha
.d.'s are coming from the united states, in our most complete engineering schools. that is a recipe for disaster. that is a recipe for disaster. we do not ever talk about it. we're just letting the thing unraveled. what about best new engineering schools, which you will be hearing about in a few days, in dallas, and they have a great school, but guess what -- i asked them onetime how many people they have from china, and this university right here, 2000, added to the top. >> this is an example of how we need to modernize our immigration policy and how we need to change education policy alice well. immigration policy is based on family relationships. it is not based on economic considerations, skills and knowledge. while we need to revitalize education for americans, we need to recognize the extent to which people are coming to america to learn we need to do what we need to do to keep them in america. >> this is our core problem. there trillions of connections in the brain called neurons. they start down at age 6 when they start public school. kids at a school soared like eagles, got college scho
north korea refugees that made it to the united states in safety. she tells the story through the eyes of the workers on the underground railroad largely people involved in christian relief organizations both here in the united states and in northeastern china who work and at great risk to their own lives trying to open up a channel for north creern refugees to escape. north korea, as you know, is probably the most repressive regime in the world at this stage. it is a place where millions of north korea citizens have literally been starved by an intelligencal government policy over the last ten to fifteen years. it's a place that houses and has housed for well over a decade of serious of -- concentration camps where political prisoners are tortured, sometimes executed for crimes no more serious than listening to a foreign radio broadcast. , reading a bible or disrespecting a picture of the dear leader. it's really a chilling book and it's a book that should be must read for anyone who cares about human rights or who cares about the political environment and the foreign policy concerns
does. he's both very commit very visible, he's something like a 70% name recognition united states. that's it you justin bieber. or we'd all we'd all probably know what he does. and when you go back over history and look at the thing starting to unfold in the election, he has deniability of one level after another. to me, the story became interested in a way because most people thought karl rove was finished in 2008 in the bush presidency started to come to an end. he had been forced out of the white house in 2007. he was the prime target in the two biggest scandals of the bush era, the valley plan affair in the united states attorney scandal. bush left a 22% approval rating from lowest in the history of the united states. and even top republican strategists like adderall and said that his version was tainted forever. no one would ever want to be a bush republican and work with karl rove. and the fact of the matter is he was back working again within a matter of weeks. and it became evident to me in early 2010 from about a year after obama took office. three things happen. the firs
for the passport. can you imagine the canadian government coming to the united states congress and asking us for blank passports? domeback. he's dealing with every level from the white house, jimmy carter, who actually approved, tony had one foot out the door in germany and a cable came into his head stop, president is reviewing. 20 minutes later, godspeed, good luck, from the president of the united states. this is unprecedented. because as he said, if this didn't a wealthy american flag was going to be draped all over it. so he's working with the canadians, working wit with a we us, working with the cia bureaucracy, and is working with the state department. and it's difficult to get everybody on the same page with the idea that they are calling the best bad idea they could come up with. he did all that. but beyond that he went and walked them through the airport on his own, which wasn't necessarily in the plan, and our headquarters often tells us don't do that. don't go in the airport with them. if it goes wrong, they will look to you. without even thinking about it they will turn and look
stoeld in the united states. he's a critic of the united states, more notably againstle elm peer yalists and some excuses from nationalizing the steel industry to the oil industry. and so a change here would mean a lot for the united states, in many different was. not just oil and energy companies but in our relations with south america in general. >> would election results come in a matter of hours or perhaps days after polls close? >> reporter: hopefully not days. they have a very organized election system here. the line-ups have been long, i can tell you that. by the same token they expect results in the wee hours. you know, perhaps six or seven hours from now we should know what's happening. there is some apprehension. this election could beery close. some people filtered out exit polls already, and they're vastly different. each side is saying they're going to win. listen to a young voter that i spoke to earlier today, and listen to what he told me when i asked him about voting. you don't want to say who you're voting for? >> yes, because the vote is secret. the important thing is t
. i think something similar has happened in the united states whereby a lot of liquidity has been provided by the central bank. >> andrew, you have operations throughout all of the world. what's your sense of growth? there are troubling reports about growth slowing down which so far have been a very powerful lifeline for global growth as united states and europe weakened, particularly china where you do a lot of business. >> i don't think we're going have an '08/'09 scenario out there for the reasons lloyd was addressed. i do think the world since '08/'09 to now has not gotten to normal. of course, the obvious, which is consumption in the u.s., is not where it was. what's replaced that is government stimuli around the world that has been effective in the main. the first chinese one was very effective. the situation in china right now, i would say, in the industrial b to b world, they're at, in my view, somewhere in the 2% range of growth. not 6%, not 7%. that's an industrial engine. thousands and thousands of small mediums are having trouble. our supply chains are weak. and, of co
of the united states, hugo chavez faces the toughest election of his life today. vengzens have been lining up all day to vote in the presidential race there. chavez has been denouncing the united states as the biggest menace to our planet. he once called former president george w. bush a donkey, a coward, an immoral person. anchor jorge ramos is in venezuela tonight for the election and i spoke with him just moments ago here. jorge, great to have you with us again tonight and president chavez finding himself in his closest race yet to hold on to power. >> reporter: absolutely. for the first time in 13 years president hugo chavez might lose the presidency. he hasn't been able to control inflation, crime, corruption and for the first time all the opposition parties got together behind one continent. this 40-year-old, former governor. >> we know that president chavez almost made it political sport to become friends with our own rivals in america but also controls a significant amount of oil that comes to the united states. >> reporter: there is a lot at stake for the united states here in venezu
? >> you can't have the united states of america out there looking over his shoulder wondering whether his vice president is going to be supporting him. mrs. ferraro has quite a few differences with vice president mondale. and i understand it when she changed her position on gas tax. she voted to end the grain embargo. if they win, and i hope they don't, but if they l win, she will have to accommodate his views, but she will give the same kind of loyalty i'm giving president reagan. one, we are not that far apart on anything. he also knows i won't be talking about him to the press, or i won't be knifing in the back by leaking to make me look good and complicate the problems for the president of the united states. >> congresswoman ferraro, your opponent has served in the house of representatives, he's been ambassador to the united nations, ambassador to china, director of the central intelligence agency and now he's been vice president for four years. how does your three terms in the house of representatives stack up against experience like that? >> well, let me first say, i wasn't born at
and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california against all enemies foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of -- for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations. thank you very much. [applause] thank you, all. our class of commissioners for 2012. 14 commissions. thank you very much. >> hello. welcome to "culturewire." we are here today with bay area artist jody chanel, and we are here to see the plaza where your piece has just been installed. >> i have been doing large-scale paintings in the galleries and museums, and the idea that in the future, i could do something that would hang out a little bit longer than the duration of the installation the kind of appeal to me. i quickly found out about the san franc
networks here in the united states that would carry everything from our e-mails and phone calls to documents and blueprints. it's raising questions about national security and chinese espionage. >> if i were an american company today and you were looking at huawei, i would find another vendor, if you care about your intellectual property, if you care about your consumers' privacy, and you care about the national security of the united states of america. >> we have prada. we have chanel. we have dolce gabbana. we have versace. we have burberry. >> stahl: luxottica started here as a small tool shop in agordo, a dot of a town in the italian alps when frames were still made of mountain goat horns. do you have any idea how many people in the world are wearing your glasses right now? >> at least half a billion. >> ♪ i wonder how many times you been had... ♪ >> simon: in the late '60s, a singer/songwriter named rodriguez cut a couple of records that got great reviews but bombed. well, they didn't sell in america, but in south africa, for some reason, rodriguez was bigger than elvis
, when you don't have basic command of facts and you're the president of the united states, whoa, that's a big problem. >> does that fear that a lot of people may share what charlie translate to people, saying, you know what i'm going to pour the money into mitt romney. >> i'm not convinced just not convinced. i think he was really appealing, if you were on the sidelines and in the middle you may be persuaded and i think that he pushed back, you know, the people most critical of romney was g.o.p. talking heads. >> republicans. >> yeah, they ripped him. now, they see him in there. >> for good reason. but they put them in their place now and that probably is the best outcome for him. >> and what mitt romney at least listened to his critics. the scary thing about president obama, four years in office and he doesn't listen. >> adam, want to go to you for the last word. >> well, mitt romney's had a lot of critics, you have to listen when it's in your own party as gerri was saying and the republican party was like, it's like some sort of weird sort of thing, and personality and-- >> and ever
their second time to the united states...and these afghan professors are enjoying the simple things in life. nat sound: "white mocha" simple things like drinking coffee...taking pictures... walking around san jose state's campus...and learning about modern journalism. they say it's a different picture than back home where journalists fear for their lives. ahamd zia ferozpur, a journalism lecturer at balkh university, says he's suprised at all the possibilites for students. (ahmad zia ferozpur/journalism lecturer at balkh university): "there are a lot of opportunities for students. they practice their journalism skills and they have radio, television, newspapers, and they have websites." the editor in chief of an afghan magazine says students in afghanistan face extreme lack of materials, like computers or even books. one of the other challenges is for afghan women--who sit on a different side of the room as men--wanting to go into journalism proffessions. in afghan society men and women are separated. in journalism school men and women sit on opposite sides of the classroom. (diane guerrazz
no mistake about it, the city and county of san francisco are supporter of the united states military. san francisco fleetwood association is a nonprofit all volunteer organization that was formed to help organize and execute fleet week. and fleet week in 2012 like 2011 and 2010 has adopted a mission to promote the humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions of the united states military. we also, of course, will have the blue angels and the air show that comes with that. the ships will be coming in and the wonderful liberty call that the wonderful men and women in the armed forces will have in san francisco. the fleet week association also, as i say, has a humanitarian and response. along with the civilian disaster response community, we'll have a senior leader seminar taking place on thursday and friday in which the military and the civilian community learn from one another on how to provide disaster response. i should mention that on wednesday morning out at ocean beach, the marine corps and the navy are setting up what's called the shock trauma platoon, a field hospital you
majority -- >> let me ask you what percentage of the hispanic community in the united states does not speak english. how big a barrier is language as you mentioned? >> that's pretty high. >> i think for the youth they speak english it's really interesting because they're the ones translating for their parents. in terms that you have a lot of those that come from latin america, when you look at the politics of latin america they equate politicians to corruption, it is what they do. the idea of having to deal with politics coming tolt united states not necessarily that's like for second nature. they would prefer to not have to go along, work with -- go to school, do what they have to do. they're such a voice and part of our united states that we need them to get more involved in that. >> i think that -- does it make sense for candidates to be fighting so hard, clely -- >> i'm saying if only ten out of 24 million latinos go to the polls. >> as hard as they fight for young people to go to the polls, i know that as democrats we're counting on high turn out among latinos, among african americans
and people coming to the united states legally. i think he has to make sure he is enforcing the laws and as you know the big issue for virginians are going to be the defense cuts and i think that is what governor romney is going to sell and i think that is ultimately what is going to help him win the commonwealth of virginia. >> geraldo: what about the latino vote, though, congressman? i underand it that defense is a huge, huge issue in the commonwealth where there is so many defense facilities. but there are substantial number of latinos there, particularly around the disdistrict of columbia. if he talks tough, first of alllet me ask you this. i withdraw that statement. the governor said he will not repeal president obama's temporary dream act measure where he gave a pass, a two year visa to those students you know story who were brought here as children. do you regret that governor romney has done that? >> no, i don't regret that he has. i think your word tough is a little different word. i think if he comes out and talks about the fact as we listen to a lot of voters concerned abo
's plan will see a single tax raised. and 95% of the people in the united states of america making less than $150,000 will get a tax break. that seems to me to be the simple fairness. the economic engine in america is the middle-class. it is the people listening to this broadcast. when you do well, america does well, even the wealthy do well. john wants to add $300 million -- $300 billion in new tax cuts each year for corporate america and the very wealthy well do nothing virtually for the middle-class. the middle class is the economic engine. is fair. they deserve the tax breaks, not the super wealthy were doing pretty well. they don't need any more tax breaks. they are paying no more than they did under ronald reagan. >> i do take issue with some of the principal, that redistribution of wealth principle. when you talk about barack's plan to tax increase affecting only those making 4250,000 that category. onesey're going to be the paying higher taxes thus resulting in fewer jobs being created and less productivity. now you said recently that higher taxes or asking for higher taxes or p
of the united states and the constitution of the state of california against all enemies foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that i will well and faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of -- for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations. thank you very much. [applause] thank you, all. our class of commissioners for 2012. 14 commissions. thank you very much. >> welcome to the 2011 spj town hall. i'm here with my co-host to welcome you to what promises to be a fascinating discussion about the changes taking place in journalism today. tonight's program is presented by the society of professional journalists in collaboration with the san francisco public library and san francisco bay area journalists. after several years of difficulty, we are seeing a lot of activity, particularly involving new media organizations.
, correct? tell us a little bit about the position. what's what's is the chief justice of the united states do in the importance of william rehnquist and then we will go into the chronology. yes go the chief has two roles in the judicial system. he is first the chief among equals on the court. he assigns the opinion when he was a majority and reach the discussion conference so he has a very poor girl to play among the nine justices. he is really the key guy there. particularly when he's in the majority but the other thing that rehnquist was is really the head of hired administration office of the courts, sort of runs the entire court system and that is a whole part of his administrative responsibilities that the other justices don't have so that is what a chief does. >> host: we will talk a little bit how he got into tha position but let's go back to the beginning. the suburb of milwaukee, born october 1 right around this time, 1924. his father was a paper salesman its mother with a homemaker but she was a dominant force in the household, right? tell me a little bit about mrs. rehnquist and
asked why are you running for the united states senate? it is so that my six grand general and -- grand children and future generations will have the promise for prosperity. that promise is rapidly slipping away because our economy is on the wrong track. 170,000 people woke up been arrested this morning without a job. if we can get our economy back on track, we can get our people back to work. i have a way to do that. i have been there. i have been bankrupt. i have lost everything. and i have been able to come back. that is what we need to do. my opponent has no plans and the policies in washington have only made things worse. you can have a path to create millions of jobs or you can have the path where someone is when to push our economy off a fiscal cliff. >> i really looking forward to this morning. i am a product of connecticut. i was raised to believe that i needed to live my life in a way to stand up to the -- for the middle-class families. that is why i passed the connecticut's them sell law, which is saving lives and the people to work. i went to congress to stand for manufactur
. >> the camp would have trained al qaeda sympathizers here in the united states. those either with u.s. passports sspoith other western country passports, and have them trained in explosive training and, frankly, soldier trainl. >> reporter: in a 2002 >> reporter: in a 2002 interview with cbs news, abu hamza downplayed his connection to the >>ganizers. >> i don't know if these people ask me some questions or some of them have come to visit the mosque. but no structured link. >> reporter: also in court today, two men who prosecutors say were part of al qaeda's london cell in the 1990. theof them, khaled al-fawwaz, allegedly served as a kind of press secretary for osama bin laden. he is charged with terrorism conspiracy, in connection with th the 1998 u.s. embassy bombings in kenya and tanzania that killed 224 people, including a dozen americans. he made sure al qaeda got credit. >> he received the statement of responsibility for the bombing three days before the bombing actually happened. so there's clear evidence that r: was connected to the group. >> reporter: all three suspects be
in oregon. >> would have trained al-qaida sympathizers here in the united states and have them trained in explosive training and soldier training. >> two other defendants entered not guilty pleas. one is charged with terrorism conspiracy in connection with the 1998 u.s. embassy bombings killing 224 people including a dozen americans. >> he received the statement of responsibility for the bombing three days before the bombing actually happened. >> this is the second time an egyptian born islamic preacher is brought to this court to answer charges. he was convicted here in 1995 for plotting to blowup the new york city bridges. >> but this case is the culmination of several years from getting extradited from the uk. the shoe bomber -- were followers. the five terror suspects were extradited to the u.s. overnight arriving in new york under tight security. cbs news, new york. >> roberto joins us now. beautiful skies for the blue angels to fly through. >> it was a gift today. absolutely stellar. tomorrow a little more cloud cover moving in to the bay area. good evening. let's take a look at
, if they -- and in return, we give them $8 million worth of money, which the united states government doesn't have that we borrowed from the chinese to give it to them. big board, if they were a for-profit entity, could still what they do for public broadcasting. the president talks about a new american patriotism, but maybe the new american patriotism is giving the private money and as they already are doing of characters and products. i mean, you know, we took our kids to sesame street shows in the communities and neighborhoods where we bought tickets, and you can buy sesame street characters for the kids. use that -- lou: marketing for big board and sesame street. my goodness, who would have thought. thank you for being here. >> you bet. lou: more on the presidential rate here with the a-team. stay with us. obamacare unplugged and extraordinary woman sums up the president's signature achievement in a long entertaining, remarkably accurate sentence. >> for those of you who might not guess, i will not read every page here, but this is the short version of obamacare. it's like 1100 pages, and i'll tell ho
to an organization. systematically displaced. western europe, the united said -- the united states. john: the government said they are not perfect. >> and we can create giant constituencies that will reinforce each other. you talk about 15,000 employees in the new york city welfare system. every one of those is a voter. they'd all like to see the systems cut. john: you argue that these mutual let societies would take care of the people they needed help if they were still around today that they would do a better job than his 15,000 employees. >> they would, could, can, and should. i give you one example the works really well in this invisible the most people. our caller synonymous. any city in the united states, 24 hours a day you can call in number. those meetings every night of the weeks. john: and it works a lot better than government rehabilitation programs. [applause] thank-you. next, a new place without a welfare state. a free city is about to be born. what will that be like? we will take you there next. ñ ♪ john: in america of the welfare state grows and government takes more
after geth elected as president of the united states and serving four years bark obama walked out on the stage and said i am black, i can't take on the white guy. whether in sports or music or acting some days you don't have the juice. we squeezed out what we could and i will offer my humble and accurate assessment of the efirst of all mitt romney countering what the obama came pair is saying about his tax proposal. >> i have five boys and i am used to people saying something that is not always true ask keep - and keep on repeating it and hope i believe it >> this was brilliant. first of all by envoking the story of his sons, it brought the sense of connection of mitt romney as a father and he raised kid more like us in that regard. countering the criticisms of mitt romney. that showed a connection and his boys had told him . let's say funny business like every body does to their partner, that said yeah, it must be normal in the romney house. but then the subtle was he was saying, you know, it doesn't matter if you are my son house or president. if you keep telling me something ov
. you cannot have the president of the united states looking over his shoulder wondering whether the vice president will be supporting him. she has quite a few differences with vice president mondale. i understood it when she changed her position. she voted to extend the grain embargo. he now says he was against it. if they win, she will have to accommodate some views. she will give him the same kind of loyalty that i am giving president reagan. one, we are not far apart on anything. i can walk into the oval office any time and give them my judgment. he might agree, and he might not. he also knows i will not be talking to it to the press and try to make myself look good to complicate problems for the president of the united states. >> your opponent has served in the house of representatives. he has been ambassador to china, director of the central intelligence agency and now he has been vice president. how you stack up against experience like that? >> let me first say i was not born at the age of 43 when i entered congress. i had a life as well. i was a teacher. there is not only
more supervision than we typically get in the united states. it's usually much more cost-effective to manage them outside of a facility with high scrutiny than it is to incarcerate. as you probably know, california spends about eight times as much money for every inmate as it does for every student in the university of california system. and so you could reorganize those resources and put they will more towards supervision and other types of things and manage a lot of those individuals that are currently incarcerated in a much more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but bein
. >> reporter: good morning, chris. as we see our gas prices in the united states rising, the election here in oil-rich venezuela takes on importance. at 6:00 a.m. the polls opened here and in this country, which is about twice the size of california, it's expected there will be a 90% voter turnout today. venezuela is the fourth largest supplier of oil to the united states. and this country has the largest oil reserves in the world. how different are things here because of that? pull into a gas station in venezuela and it takes less than $3 to fill up an empty suv. but oil production in venezuela has dropped 30% in the last decade, which is one reason for hour higher gas prices. oil industry experts in the united states say president hugo chavez, who's been no friend of the united states, has failed to invest in the oil industry that he nationalized in the early 2000s. challenging chavez is 40-year-old enrique. he's thin, energetic and some say the sexy candidate. a sign that folks here feel the vote could be close and perhaps contested. grocery stores have been mobbed as if residents are p
, i hope that the united states of america, and whoever will be elected, will take a leadership decision, maybe it's not popular that it will be a moral decision to stop the nuclear race in iran today. and i don't know how many of you have followed the weekly reports, and what was written there, but something very interesting popped up from the report. when you go into look at the writing of the arab leaders, not israelis, not jewish, arab leaders in the middle east, they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today between the option of allowing iran to become nuclear, to the option of fighting ourselves, i t
with new ideas and energy. and they saw the president of the united states sleep walking. >> mike, i don't think -- >> let me finish. the tired contrast rang a bell. romney has ideas, and the president has no vision for his second term. and i think that's what hurt him. >> mike, i don't doubt this was someone they had never seen before. i think there were people in the romney campaign who had never seen this candidate. a week ago paul ryan was asked to explain the math of a $4.8 trillion tax cut. and he said i don't have time. mitt romney said we just don't do math. like math doesn't exist. let me finish. you simply cannot wish away the existence of your entire campaign platform. as inconvenient as it may be when somebody says to you, ok, if you're going to reduce revenue by $4. trillion, you're not going to tell us one loophole you'd close, you're not going to run up the deficit or taxes on the middle class. >> very quickly -- >> no, no. it goes back to bill clinton. >> there was a story out yesterday that that claim is fiction because you don't count the loophole closing. >> what looph
as a member and chairman of the foreign committee. middle east, southwest asia, the united states has been there in the last four decades. joe biden has too. of course, congressman paul ryan who chairs the house budget committee also likes to tout his foreign policy chops. >> i have more foreign policy experience coming into this job than president obama did coming into his. >> can you explain how do you have more foreign policy experience than senator obama did. he was on the foreign relations committee. >> norah, i voted to send men and women to war. i've been to iraq and afghanistan. i've met with our troops to get perspectives. i've been to the funerals, i've talked to the widows, talked to the wives, the moms and the dads. that's something. that matters. >> yeah. the sitting vice president shouldn't have much problem landing a blow on a claim like that. though perhaps rather than boxing, it's more accurate to think of thursday night as tag team wrestling with each candidate making the power move that their partner missed. of course, ultimately a vice presidential candidate's relations
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 166 (some duplicates have been removed)